Helping Patients Navigate Device Recalls

Aug 28, 2013
When there is a product recall, or simply when you have a question, specialist pharmacists can be your resource for disease management questions.
Tags
  • Diabetes

Device recalls can be stressful. Even for patients who may not use a particular product that is recalled, they may still worry about the safety and efficacy of the device they use. As the Diabetes Specialist Practice Leader for Express Scripts, pharmacists on my team get device-related questions from the patients they talk to every day.

If you use a device that has been recalled, here are some things you should do:

  • Do not ignore the recall even if your device appears to function well. Not knowing when your blood glucose is extremely high could place you at serious risk of hospitalization because of insufficient insulin and be potentially life threatening.
  • Contact the manufacturer to get a free replacement model.
  • Continue to monitor your blood sugar with your old monitor until the new one arrives. If you think your blood sugar has become too high, or if you see warning symptoms, contact your physician.

Express Scripts members should know that our specialist pharmacists are here to help, not just with specific device-related questions, but with whatever the patients need. Our specialist pharmacists put their training to use to help patients make the best decisions about their health. For someone with diabetes, it’s important to know how often to test, what their target blood glucose values should be, and what part their self monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) plays in the overall management of their diabetes.

If they have specific questions, Express Scripts members can call the customer service number on their membership card and simply ask for a diabetes specialist pharmacist.

To report problems with a blood glucose meter, contact MedWatch, the FDA's safety information and adverse event reporting program, by telephone at 1-800-FDA-1088; by fax at 1-800-FDA-0178; online at https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/medwatch/

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